This site is dedicated to all things I see and that I think are interesting to publish almost always are other very smart people.

Posts tagged “jazz

WEBSITE: Jazz Near You Event Submission Form Improves

eventsubmissionform2017.png

The Jazz Near You event submission form for single or recurring events was upgraded resulting in a more user-friendly experience while reducing submission time. The new interface is more intuitive and prompts the user for WHO, WHERE, and WHEN information with each of the three steps annotated for clarity…


MISHA MENGELBERG and ICP ORCHESTRA – Japan Japon (LP-1982 + 7inch single)

Label: Instant Composers Pool ‎– ICP 024, DIW ‎– DIW 1014,
           International Music Activity ‎– IMA 1
Format: Vinyl, LP, Album / Country: Japan / Released: 1982
Style: Free Improvisation
Recorded on 11 May 1982 at Osaka and 17 May 1982 in Tokyo.
Recording Engineer by – Tsutomu Suto
Painting and design by – Tomiyasu Shiraiwa
Back cover photos by – Mitsuyoshi Nishida and Tsutomu Suto
Includes liner notes in Japanese by Kazunori Sugiyama
Produced by IMA (International Music Activity)
Co-produced by ICP (Instant Composers Pool)
This Japanese release included limited bonus 7inch single:
ICP ORCHESTRA – Caravan, DIW  1001, 33 1/3 rpm, (JAP) 1982
A1 – Salute To Fujisawa Shukoh ………………………………………… 2:50
A2 – Kwela …………………………………………………………………….. 17:42
a)      Hap
b)      Boodschappen
c)      Welkom
d)      Briefkaart
e)      Maurits
B1- Habanera …………………………………………………………………. 6:21
B2 – Carnaval ………………………………………………………………….. 3:35
B3- Japan Japon …………………………………………………………….. 7:10
B4- Zing Zang Zaterdag …………………………………………………… 3:14
+
C  –  Caravan (7inch single) ……………………………………………….. 7:12
Artists:
Misha Mengelberg – piano, voice
Han Bennink – drums, percussion
Peter Brötzmann – tenor sax, alto sax, bass sax, voice
Keshavan Maslak – tenor sax, alto sax, voice
Michael Moore – alto sax, clarinet
Toshinori Kondo – trumpet, voice
Walter Wierbos – trombone
Joep Maassen – trombone
Larry Fishkind – tuba
Maurice Horsthuis – viola
Recorded live on May 11th (Osaka) and 17th (Tokyo),  ICP Orchestra Japan Tour in 1982.
Instant Composers Pool (ICP) is an independent Dutch jazz and improvised music label and orchestra. Founded in 1967, the label takes its name from the notion that improvisation is “instant composition”. The ICP label has published more than 50 releases to date, with most of its releases featuring the ICP Orchestra and its members.
In 1967 saxophonist Willem Breuker, pianist Misha Mengelberg and drummer Han Bennink founded the ICP label in Amsterdam. Mengelberg and Bennink had been playing together since 1961 and found success as members of Eric Dolphy’s quartet in 1964, as documented on his live album Last Date. Mengelberg had also been involved in the Fluxus art movement and was developing a composition style that involved musical games. As European free jazz musicians, they were butting up against disinterest in their music from contemporary jazz labels, so they formed a cooperative as a means to release their own recordings. Mengelberg coined the label’s name as a testament to improvisation being composition at the instant that the music is played. ICP’s first records documented Breuker and Bennink’s New Acoustic Swing Duo, and a trio of Mengelberg and Bennink with John Tchicai, whose album was titled Instant Composers Pool…
Breuker left ICP in 1974 to concentrate on his group, the Willem Breuker Collective, and went on to found his own record label, BVHaast. Mengelberg and Bennink intensified their collaboration and, widening their own musical project as the Instant Composers Pool Tentet with saxophonist Peter Brötzmann and cellist Tristan Honsinger. Throughout the 1970s, the ICP label continued to release records, many as co-productions with other European independent labels, including albums by Jeanne Lee, Derek Bailey, Dudu Pukwana, Steve Lacy, Paul Rutherford, Evan Parker, Maarten Altena and Peter Brötzmann. Most of these releases were of limited (and sometimes even numbered) edition and featured a distinctive idiosyncratic graphic design by Bennink.

LP Japan Japon + 7inch single – Caravan

A stunning early 80s performance from pianist Misha Mengelberg – working here with the ICP Orchestra, and at a level that’s completely fresh and very striking – at a mode when the Dutch jazz approach was something very new indeed, and handled here with a wonderful balance between playful arrangements and fierce improvisations! In addition to Misha on piano, the lineup also includes Han Bennink on drums and percussion, Keshavan Maslak on alto, Walter Wierbos on trombone, Peter Brötzmann on alto and baritone, Maurice Horsthuis on viola, and Toshinori Kondo on trumpet – and most of the players vocalize at some point – but in ways that aren’t really singing, and instead act as a great addition to their improvised musicianship. Larry Fishkind also throws in some incredible work on tuba – really amazing sounds – and titles include “Kwela”, “Japan Japon”, “Habanera”, “Carnaval” and “Zing Zang Zaterdag”………
and +
ICP ORCHESTRA – Caravan, DIW  1001, 33 1/3 rpm, (JAP) 1982
One sided rare 7” , released together with ”Japan Japon” 12” LP
Another Japan released musical BOMB…. The legendary ICP Orchestra  under chef Mengelberg´s  leadership playing Ellington´s Caravan in a very wonderful and dreamy way… until… until… Peter Brötzmann enters the stage with some WILD blowing that makes hearts and clocks stop. Totally beautiful playing from Brötzmann, absolutely over the top. The greatest story teller of them all, hits again.
Listening to this music makes the world feel like a better place to be.
Enjoy!

JAPO complete

I have now reviewed every release in the JAPO catalogue. Shout outs to Craig LeHoullier, Steve Lake, and Bernd Webler for helping make my JAPO listening complete!

Any of you regular readers out there might have noticed that I recently reviewed the two latest XtraWATT albums. These stand as my backward entry into ECM’s other sub-labels. I do, of course, plan to also explore WATT and CARMO in full on this site, although such reviews may be sporadic, mixed in as they will be with the most up-to-date ECMs, along with albums from farther afield.

Below is a list of all JAPO releases, hyperlinked to my reviews for your convenience.

JAPO 60001 Mal Waldron The Call (Feb 1971)
JAPO 60002 Abdullah Ibrahim African Piano (Oct 1969)
JAPO 60003 Barre Phillips For All It Is (Mar 1971)
JAPO 60004 Herbert Joos The Philosophy of the Fluegelhorn (Jul 1973)
JAPO 60005 Dollar Brand Ancient Africa (Jun 1972)
JAPO 60006 Bobby Naughton Understanding (Oct 1971)
JAPO 60007 Edward Vesala Nan Madol (Apr 1974)
JAPO 60008 Jiří Stivín & Rudolf Dašek System Tandem (May 1974)
JAPO 60009 Children At Play s/t (1973)
JAPO 60010 Enrico Rava “Quotation Marks” (Dec 1973, Apr 1974)
JAPO 60011 Magog s/t (Nov 1974)
JAPO 60012 OM Kirikuki (Oct 1975)
JAPO 60013 Manfred Schoof Quintet Scales (Aug 1976)
JAPO 60014 Larry Karush/Glen Moore May 24, 1976 (May 1976)
JAPO 60015 Herbert Joos Daybreak (Oct 1976)
JAPO 60016 OM Rautionaha (Dec 1976)
JAPO 60017 Stephan Micus Implosions (Mar 1977)
JAPO 60018 Ken Hyder’s Talisker Land Of Stone (Apr 1977)
JAPO 60019 Manfred Schoof Quintet Light Lines (Dec 1977)
JAPO 60020 Rena Rama Landscapes (Jun 1977)
JAPO 60021 Globe Unity Orchestra Improvisations (Sep 1977)
JAPO 60022 OM OM with Dom Um Romao (Aug 1977)
JAPO 60023 Lennart Åberg Partial Solar Eclipse (Sep 1977)
JAPO 60024 Contact Trio New Marks (Jan 1978)
JAPO 60025 George Gruntz Percussion Profiles (Sep 1977)
JAPO 60026 Stephan Micus Till The End Of Time (Jun 1978)
JAPO 60027 Globe Unity Compositions (Jan 1979)
JAPO 60028 Barry Guy Endgame (Apr 1979)
JAPO 60029 TOK Paradox (Jun 1979)
JAPO 60030 Manfred Schoof Quintet Horizons (Nov 1979)
JAPO 60031 AMM III It Had Been an Ordinary Enough Day… (Dec 1979)
JAPO 60032 OM Cerberus (Jan 1980)
JAPO 60033 Elton Dean Quintet Boundaries (Feb 1980)
JAPO 60034 Peter Warren Solidarity
JAPO 60035 Tom van der Geld/Children At Play Out Patients (Jul 1980)
JAPO 60036 Contact Trio Musik (Oct 1980)
JAPO 60037 Es herrscht Uhu im Land s/t (Dec 1980)
JAPO 60038 Stephan Micus Wings Over Water (Jan 1981)
JAPO 60039 The Globe Unity Orchestra Intergalactic Blow (Jun 1982)
JAPO 60040 Stephan Micus Listen to the Rain (Jun 1980, Jul 1983)
JAPO 60041 Stephan Micus East Of The Night (Jan 1985)


My Letter to Santa Claus and Los Tres Kings Magicians

I’m looking for the release of JAPO Records, anyone can share with me in MP3 or FLAC from already thank you very much, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Estoy buscando los release de JAPO Records, que alguien pueda compartir conmigo en MP3 or FLAC desde ya muchas gracias, Feliz Navidad y próspero año nuevo.

Sto cercando la liberazione di Japo Records, chiunque può condividere con me in MP3 o FLAC da già vi ringrazio molto, Buon Natale e Felice Anno Nuovo.

私はJAPOレコードのリリースを探しています、誰もがすでにからMP3やFLACに私と一緒に共有することができ、非常にメリークリスマスと新年をありがとう。

children-at-play1Children At Play Contact Trio daybreak-dark Elton Dean Quintet Enrico Rava Es herrscht Uhu im Land JAPO 60037 Herbert Joos Horizons (JAPO 60030) improvisations Globe Unity land-of-stone1Ken Hyder’s Talisker light-lines magog Mal Waldron may-24-1976 Larry Karush om-with-dom-um-romaoOM with Dom Um Romao partial-solar-eclipse Percussion Profiles Rena Rama resonanceManfred Schoof Quintet scales system-tandem the-alternate-call Tom van der Geld understandingBobby Naughton Units


Video

Ensemble Denada – Windfall (Ozella Music,2013)

Quiero que os fijéis muy bien en la portada de este trabajo,
con esa tipografía y colocación del título del álbum,
“WINDFALL”. ¿Qué os sugiere? Parece el perfil de una montaña
rusa, ¿verdad? Pues algo así es el último trabajo, tercero
en la discografía, de la Big Band Ensemble Denada; un
sube-y-baja constante, disco lleno de emociones.


Link

Various Artists – Selected Signs III-VIII (2013) [6 CDs] {ECM 2350-55}

Selected III Disc Selected IV Disc Selected V Disc Selected VI Disc Selected VII Disc Selected VIII DiscVarious Artists – Selected Signs III-VIII (2013) [6 CDs] {ECM 2350-55}

Track List

CD 1 – Selected Signs III

01. Heiner Goebbels: In einem alten Fahrstuhl (from Der Mann im Fahrstuhl)
02. Steve Reich: Music for 18 Musicians (excerpt) (Steve Reich and Musicians)
03. Arvo Pärt: Fratres (Gidon Kremer, Keith Jarrett)
04. Arvo Pärt: Ludus from Tabula rasa (Gidon Kremer, Tatjana Grindenko, Alfred Schnittke, Lithuanian Chamber Orchestra/ Saulius Sondeckis)
05. György Kurtág; Aus der Ferne (from Játékok) (Márta Kurtág)
06. J S Bach: Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit (Sonatina from ‘Actus tragicus’, BWV 106 transcribed by György Kurtág) (Márta & György Kurtág)
07. Tigran Mansurian: Testament (Rosamunde Quartet)
08. Betty Olivero: Neharót Neharót (excerpt) (Kim Kashkashian, Münchener Kammerorchester/Alexander Liebreich)
09. C P E Bach: Fantasie für Klavier fis-Moll (Alexei Lubimov)
10. Joseph Haydn: The Seven Last Words of our Saviour on the Cross – IV. Largo (Rosamunde Quartet)
11. River
12. Meredith Monk: Scared Song (from Do You Be)
13. Heiner Goebbels: Der Chef (from Der Mann im Fahrstuhl)

CD 2 – Selected Signs IV

01. Heiner Goebbels: Hörstück II (“Ich möchte Ihnen einen Vorschlag machen…”)/ Kleine Passacaglia/Über den Selbstmord (from Eislermaterial)
02. Giya Kancheli: Vom Winde beweint – I. Largo molto (Kim Kashkashian, Orchester der Beethovenhalle Bonn/Dennis Russell Davies)
03. John Tavener: Funeral Canticle (excerpt) (with kind permission of Harmonia Mundi)
04. Dmitri Shostakovich: String Quartet No.15 – I. Elegy (Keller Quartet)
05. Arvo Pärt: Most Holy Mother of God (from Officium Novum) (The Hilliard Ensemble)
06. Tres morillas m’enamoran (Spanish anonymous) (from Officium Novum) (Jan Garbarek, The Hilliard Ensemble)
07. Dmitri Shostakovich: Chamber Symphony op. 110 bis – I. Largo (Stuttgarter Kammerorchester / Dennis Russell Davies)
08. Valentin Silvestrov: I. Postludium ‘DSCH’ (Maacha Duebner, Simon Fordham, Anja Lechner, Silke Avenhaus)
09. Valentin Silvestrov: III. Postludium (Anja Lechner, Silke Avenhaus)

CD 3 – Selected Signs V

1-12: Eleni Karaindrou: Concert In Athens
01. Voyage / 2. Closed Roads / 3. Invocation / 4. Tango of Love / 5. Tom’s Theme / 6. Laura’s Waltz / 7. Adagio / 8. After Memory / 9. Farewell Theme / 10. Seeking Theme / 11. Nostalgia Song / 12. Requiem for Willy Loman, var.
13. Eleni Karaindrou: The Weeping Meadow
14. Karaindrou: Memories (from Elegy of the Uprooting)
15. Jan Garbarek: Dis (from Dis)
16. Jon Balke /Amina Alaoui: O Andalusin (from Siwan)
17. Jon Balke /Amina Alaoui: Ashiyin Raïqin (from Siwan)
18-21 Rolf Lislevand Ensemble: Music based on early baroque compositions, arr. Rolf Lislevand (from Nuove musiche)
18. Passacaglia andaluz II
19. Toccata
20. Passacaglia cromatica
21. Arpeggiata addio

CD 4 – Selected Signs VI

1-11: Andrey Dergatchev: Music for the film ‘The Return’:
01. Underwater / 2. In The Bedroom / 3. The Road / 4. Mugam / 5. Japan / 6. Port / 7. Rehearsal / 8. Piano / 9. Georgians / 10. Final Titles / 11. Wolf
12-18 Nils Petter Molvær:
12. Khmer / 13. Tløn / 14. Access/Song Of Sand I / 15. On Stream / 16. Platonic Years / 17. Plum / 18. Song Of Sand II (from Khmer)
19. Eivind Aarset: Close (For Comfort) (from Dream Logic)

CD 5 – Selected Signs VII

01. Stefano Battaglia Trio: Euphonia Elegy (music Battaglia) (from Songways)
02. Food: Celestial Food (music Strønen/Ballamy/Fennesz) (from Mercurial Balm)
03. Tord Gustavsen Quartet: Prelude (music Gustavsen) (from The Well)
04. Egberto Gismonti: Memoria e Fado (marrom) (from Dança dos Escravos)
05. Norma Winstone Trio: Like A Lover (music: Dori Caymmi) (from Stories Yet To Tell)
06. Norma Winstone Trio: Cradle Song (Hoy Nazan) (music Komitas arr. Tigran Mansurian) (from Stories Yet To Tell)
07. Jan Garbarek/Egberto Gismonti /Charlie Haden: Carta de Amor (music Gismonti) (from Magico – Carta de Amor)
08. Ralph Alessi: Zone (from Baida)
09. & 10. Anja Lechner/Vassilis Tsabropoulos: Trois morceaux après des hymnes byzantins I & II (music Tsabropoulos) (from Chants, Hymns and Dances)
11. Colin Vallon Trio: Telepathy (music Patrice Moret) (from Rruga)
12. Christian Wallumrød Ensemble: Solemn Mosquitoes (music Wallumrød)
13. Christian Wallumrød Ensemble: Blop (music Wallumrød) (from Fabula Suite Lugano)
14. Tomasz Stanko Quartet: Song for Ania (music Stanko) (from Lontano)

CD 6 – Selected Signs VIII

01. Jimmy Giuffre 3: Jesus Maria (music Carla Bley)
02. Paul Bley /Evan Parker /Barre Phillips: Time Will Tell
03. Barre Phillips/Feichtner /Surman/Martin: Mountainscapes V
04. Old And New Dreams: Lonely Woman (music Ornette Coleman)
05. Robin Williamson: The Four Points Are Thus Beheld (music Williamson / Dunmall / Möller)
06. Sinikka Langeland: Langt innpå skoga
07. Frode Haltli: Psalm (traditional, arr. Haltli)
08. Gary Peacock: Voice from the Past
09. Steve Kuhn Trio with Joe Lovano: Spiritual (music John Coltrane)
10. Wadada Leo Smith: Kulture of Jazz
11. Robin Williamson: The World

Selected Signs III – VIII. Music selected for the exhibition ECM – A Cultural Archaeology at Haus der Kunst, Munich


Thomas Chapin – Never Let Me Go: Quartets ’95 & ’96 (2012) by exy

 

Thomas Chapin

Never Let Me Go: Quartets ’95 & ’96 is a 3-disc set featuring two late-career performances by saxophonist Thomas Chapin, including his final New York concert before succumbing to leukemia in 1998 at age 40. Discs one and two capture Chapin’s working quartet of the time, with pianist Peter Madsen, bassist Kiyoto Fujiwara and drummer Reggie Nicholson, performing at Flushing Town Hall in Queens on November 10th, 1995. The group played two selections from You Don’t Know Me (Arabesque Records), as well as a wide variety of other material, including Artie Shaw’s Moonray, Thelonious Monk’s Ugly Beauty, Charlie Parker’s Red Cross and Jimmy Webb’s Wichita Lineman. In contrast, the third disc captures the first and only..

VBR~248 kbps | 346 MB | UL | CL | MC

…concert ever played by a later quartet featuring Madsen, bassist Scott Colley and drummer Matt Wilson at The Knitting Factory on December 19th, 1996. For what turned out to be his final performance in New York, this ensemble presented extended readings of three new pieces written specifically for its all-star lineup, as well as a version of his well-known composition Sky Piece and an arrangement of Roland Kirk’s Lovellevellilloqui.

To get a handle on the musical scope of Thomas Chapin, look no further than the second CD of this three-disc set. Taken from a 1995 live performance, it begins with Thelonious Monk’s rare waltz “Ugly Beauty,” followed by Charlie Parker’s equally deep cut “Red Cross” (which lasts over 15 fun-filled minutes), into the Glen Campbell pop hit “Wichita Lineman.” The late alto saxophonist approaches each song with the same degree of seriousness, whether caressing the ballad, honking out an unaccompanied postbop intro or shedding some deserved light on what might be written off as middle-of-the-road fluff.
Jazz history has more than its fair share of gifted artists who died too young, but Chapin’s bio hits harder. A regular at the Knitting Factory club and on its companion label, Chapin, on alto and flute, dabbled in avant-garde situations but often stuck with a more aggressive version of straight-ahead jazz. Diagnosed with leukemia, he died at age 40 in 1998, well into a career that was catching fire and about to advance, as these recordings show. All three of these discs feature him with a quartet, a new setting after leading trios for many years.

The first two discs come from a 1995 performance at New York’s Flushing Town Hall. While the aforementioned second set includes unique covers, the first is no slouch either. Artie Shaw’s “Moonray” is especially captivating, with bassist Kiyoto Fujiwara thumping out some descending double-stops, over which Chapin’s alto dances softly before everyone locks into a straight 4/4 rhythm. “You Don’t Know Me” is another chestnut that might seem destined for the cocktail lounge, but the quartet distills the syrup from it. Chapin’s own writing is featured in the extended “Opuwo” and “Scratch Boogie.” The former reveals his Jackie McLean influence in terms of composition, with its move between flowing rubato and steady swing, and in alto tone, though his sound isn’t quite as tart as his predecessor.

After the three-way hit in set two, Chapin brings out his flute for the lyrical title track, which he plays with the same type of muscle he brings to his saxophone. Throughout both of these discs, Fujiwara adds subtle coloring to a variety of moods, and it’s especially noticeable here. Pianist Peter Madsen works equally well in a clean situation or stirring up a cloud of dust.

As good as the first two discs are, disc three blows them out of the water. Recorded in December 1996, a few months before Chapin became ill, he teams up with Madsen, bassist Scott Colley and drummer Matt Wilson, in a lineup Chapin envisioned as a supergroup that would help him reach a bigger audience. He couldn’t have been more accurate, at least in terms of the chemistry. Onstage at the Knitting Factory they tackle the saxophonist’s frenetic “Whirlygig” with fury.

By contrast, “Big Maybe” sounds more like a tone poem, with Colley laying down a hypnotic foundation. First on flute, then alto, Chapin rises over a wave of sounds. “Sky Piece,” which Chapin also recorded with his trio, begins with an unaccompanied Colley solo before Chapin enters on flute, recorded with the perfect amount of reverb to accent the minor melody’s haunting, lyrical qualities. They end the set with a rousing rendition of “Lovellevellilloqui,” which comes from one of Chapin’s other heroes, Rahsaan Roland Kirk.


Thomas Chapin – Never Let Me Go: Quartets ’95 & ’96 (2012) by exy

 

Thomas Chapin

Never Let Me Go: Quartets ’95 & ’96 is a 3-disc set featuring two late-career performances by saxophonist Thomas Chapin, including his final New York concert before succumbing to leukemia in 1998 at age 40. Discs one and two capture Chapin’s working quartet of the time, with pianist Peter Madsen, bassist Kiyoto Fujiwara and drummer Reggie Nicholson, performing at Flushing Town Hall in Queens on November 10th, 1995. The group played two selections from You Don’t Know Me (Arabesque Records), as well as a wide variety of other material, including Artie Shaw’s Moonray, Thelonious Monk’s Ugly Beauty, Charlie Parker’s Red Cross and Jimmy Webb’s Wichita Lineman. In contrast, the third disc captures the first and only..

VBR~248 kbps | 346 MB | UL | CL | MC

…concert ever played by a later quartet featuring Madsen, bassist Scott Colley and drummer Matt Wilson at The Knitting Factory on December 19th, 1996. For what turned out to be his final performance in New York, this ensemble presented extended readings of three new pieces written specifically for its all-star lineup, as well as a version of his well-known composition Sky Piece and an arrangement of Roland Kirk’s Lovellevellilloqui.

To get a handle on the musical scope of Thomas Chapin, look no further than the second CD of this three-disc set. Taken from a 1995 live performance, it begins with Thelonious Monk’s rare waltz “Ugly Beauty,” followed by Charlie Parker’s equally deep cut “Red Cross” (which lasts over 15 fun-filled minutes), into the Glen Campbell pop hit “Wichita Lineman.” The late alto saxophonist approaches each song with the same degree of seriousness, whether caressing the ballad, honking out an unaccompanied postbop intro or shedding some deserved light on what might be written off as middle-of-the-road fluff.
Jazz history has more than its fair share of gifted artists who died too young, but Chapin’s bio hits harder. A regular at the Knitting Factory club and on its companion label, Chapin, on alto and flute, dabbled in avant-garde situations but often stuck with a more aggressive version of straight-ahead jazz. Diagnosed with leukemia, he died at age 40 in 1998, well into a career that was catching fire and about to advance, as these recordings show. All three of these discs feature him with a quartet, a new setting after leading trios for many years.

The first two discs come from a 1995 performance at New York’s Flushing Town Hall. While the aforementioned second set includes unique covers, the first is no slouch either. Artie Shaw’s “Moonray” is especially captivating, with bassist Kiyoto Fujiwara thumping out some descending double-stops, over which Chapin’s alto dances softly before everyone locks into a straight 4/4 rhythm. “You Don’t Know Me” is another chestnut that might seem destined for the cocktail lounge, but the quartet distills the syrup from it. Chapin’s own writing is featured in the extended “Opuwo” and “Scratch Boogie.” The former reveals his Jackie McLean influence in terms of composition, with its move between flowing rubato and steady swing, and in alto tone, though his sound isn’t quite as tart as his predecessor.

After the three-way hit in set two, Chapin brings out his flute for the lyrical title track, which he plays with the same type of muscle he brings to his saxophone. Throughout both of these discs, Fujiwara adds subtle coloring to a variety of moods, and it’s especially noticeable here. Pianist Peter Madsen works equally well in a clean situation or stirring up a cloud of dust.

As good as the first two discs are, disc three blows them out of the water. Recorded in December 1996, a few months before Chapin became ill, he teams up with Madsen, bassist Scott Colley and drummer Matt Wilson, in a lineup Chapin envisioned as a supergroup that would help him reach a bigger audience. He couldn’t have been more accurate, at least in terms of the chemistry. Onstage at the Knitting Factory they tackle the saxophonist’s frenetic “Whirlygig” with fury.

By contrast, “Big Maybe” sounds more like a tone poem, with Colley laying down a hypnotic foundation. First on flute, then alto, Chapin rises over a wave of sounds. “Sky Piece,” which Chapin also recorded with his trio, begins with an unaccompanied Colley solo before Chapin enters on flute, recorded with the perfect amount of reverb to accent the minor melody’s haunting, lyrical qualities. They end the set with a rousing rendition of “Lovellevellilloqui,” which comes from one of Chapin’s other heroes, Rahsaan Roland Kirk.


Vincent Peirani – Thrill Box (2013) by exy

 

vincent-peiraniThrill Box is Vincent Peirani’s debut release on the ACT label. Its title refers to Peirani’s instrument of choice, the accordion. For many, the accordion springs most readily to mind as an East European folk instrument, for others it evokes images of Morris dancers on warm English spring evenings (although that’s more usually the concertina) or summers at a French pavement cafe, for others still it’s part of the musical culture of South America. On this mixture of original tunes, jazz classics and American traditional songs it’s all of those things — as well as a front-line jazz instrument.
Peirani started out as a classical music scholar, aged 12 and he’s played with stars including fellow ACT Music artists Ulf Wakenius and Youn Sun Nah. His technical mastery of the accordion is…

320 kbps | 122 MB | UL | CL | MC ** FLAC

…impressive enough, but he couples this with a strong sense of humor and of musicality. He opens and closesThrill Box with stunning solo performances of “Choral” and Joseph Canteloube’s “Bailero.” Both tunes demand control and precision from the performer: Peirani shows that he has both skills in abundance as well as the maturity required to maximise the tunes’ emotional impact.

Things can get a little more upbeat when the accordionist is joined by bassist Michel Benita of Trio Libero and pianist Michael Wollny of [em]. “Upbeat” mustn’t be confused with “up-tempo”: the characteristic pace of the music remains languid and relaxed, but the mood lightens and a feeling of joy emanates from the players whether they’re performing a gentle waltz (Brad Mehldau’s “Waltz For JB”) or a spiky bebop classic (Thelonious Monk’s “I Mean You”).

Benita is in masterful form throughout, never playing two notes if one will suffice—and always playing the rightone. Wollny complements Peirani’s accordion melodies with some delightful melodic phrasing of his own—his playing on “Waltz For JB” is superb—and also adds depth with his rhythmic chordal playing.

Peirani digs deep into the roots of American music with versions of “Goodnight Irene” and “Shenandoah” that bring to the fore the inherent sense of longing at the center of both songs. “Goodnight Irene” is a duet between Benita’s bass and Peirani’s accordina (a small instrument that resembles a cross between accordion and harmonica): “Shenandoah” is a laid-back trio performance that’s as spacious as the American landscape it evokes.

Joy is pretty much unconfined on “3 Temps Pour Michel P,” Peirani’s tribute to his guest Michel Portal. Portal’s bass clarinet adds a rich texture to “B&H”: his bandoneon on this tune combines with Peirani’s accordion in a duet that’s fun, funny and distinctly groovy. Throw in Peirani’s enthusiastic vocalisation and the song becomes completely irresistible.

An accordion may not be everyone’s idea of a Thrill Box but Peirani does more than enough to justify the album’s title and this description of his instrument. The thrills may be more cerebral than visceral, but there are plenty of them—and it seems clear that he’s got plenty more to come.

Personnel: Vincent Peirani: accordion, accordina (4), vocals (3, 7); Michael Wollny: piano, Fender Rhodes (6); Michel Benita: bass; Michel Portal: bass clarinet (5), bandoneon (7); Emile Parisien: soprano saxophone (6, 11).


Vincent Peirani – Thrill Box (2013) by exy

 

vincent-peiraniThrill Box is Vincent Peirani’s debut release on the ACT label. Its title refers to Peirani’s instrument of choice, the accordion. For many, the accordion springs most readily to mind as an East European folk instrument, for others it evokes images of Morris dancers on warm English spring evenings (although that’s more usually the concertina) or summers at a French pavement cafe, for others still it’s part of the musical culture of South America. On this mixture of original tunes, jazz classics and American traditional songs it’s all of those things — as well as a front-line jazz instrument.
Peirani started out as a classical music scholar, aged 12 and he’s played with stars including fellow ACT Music artists Ulf Wakenius and Youn Sun Nah. His technical mastery of the accordion is…

320 kbps | 122 MB | UL | CL | MC ** FLAC

…impressive enough, but he couples this with a strong sense of humor and of musicality. He opens and closesThrill Box with stunning solo performances of “Choral” and Joseph Canteloube’s “Bailero.” Both tunes demand control and precision from the performer: Peirani shows that he has both skills in abundance as well as the maturity required to maximise the tunes’ emotional impact.

Things can get a little more upbeat when the accordionist is joined by bassist Michel Benita of Trio Libero and pianist Michael Wollny of [em]. “Upbeat” mustn’t be confused with “up-tempo”: the characteristic pace of the music remains languid and relaxed, but the mood lightens and a feeling of joy emanates from the players whether they’re performing a gentle waltz (Brad Mehldau’s “Waltz For JB”) or a spiky bebop classic (Thelonious Monk’s “I Mean You”).

Benita is in masterful form throughout, never playing two notes if one will suffice—and always playing the rightone. Wollny complements Peirani’s accordion melodies with some delightful melodic phrasing of his own—his playing on “Waltz For JB” is superb—and also adds depth with his rhythmic chordal playing.

Peirani digs deep into the roots of American music with versions of “Goodnight Irene” and “Shenandoah” that bring to the fore the inherent sense of longing at the center of both songs. “Goodnight Irene” is a duet between Benita’s bass and Peirani’s accordina (a small instrument that resembles a cross between accordion and harmonica): “Shenandoah” is a laid-back trio performance that’s as spacious as the American landscape it evokes.

Joy is pretty much unconfined on “3 Temps Pour Michel P,” Peirani’s tribute to his guest Michel Portal. Portal’s bass clarinet adds a rich texture to “B&H”: his bandoneon on this tune combines with Peirani’s accordion in a duet that’s fun, funny and distinctly groovy. Throw in Peirani’s enthusiastic vocalisation and the song becomes completely irresistible.

An accordion may not be everyone’s idea of a Thrill Box but Peirani does more than enough to justify the album’s title and this description of his instrument. The thrills may be more cerebral than visceral, but there are plenty of them—and it seems clear that he’s got plenty more to come.

Personnel: Vincent Peirani: accordion, accordina (4), vocals (3, 7); Michael Wollny: piano, Fender Rhodes (6); Michel Benita: bass; Michel Portal: bass clarinet (5), bandoneon (7); Emile Parisien: soprano saxophone (6, 11).


Evgeny Svetlanov – Gershwin – Porgy & Bess, American In Paris (16.01.1980 – Live – Moscow) LP, MP3 by PANOVNIK

 
 

01_-_Gershwin_George_-_Symphonic_Suite__An_American_In_Paris
02_-_Gershwin_George_-_Symphonic_Picture__Porgy_&_Bess_

U.S.S.R. State Symphony, Evgeny Svetlanov

Grand Hall of Moscow Conservatory, Live; 16.01.1980

Vinyl rip


End-of-year Lists Galore by noreply@blogger.com (Stef)

Allright, here they are then, the albums of the year 2012 as selected by the entire review team of the Free Jazz Collective. Each reviewer presented his (unfortunately not her) list of the ten best albums of the year. Based on the commonalities between those lists, we selected the top-10 that we all favoured.

The Free Jazz Collective Top-10 albums of 2012
  1. Eve Risser, Benjamin Duboc & Edward Perraud – En Corps
  2. Angles 8 – By Way Of Deception
  3. The Thing With Barry Guy – Metal!
  4. Aram Shelton Quartet – Everything for Somebody
  5. Henry Threadgill Zooid – Tomorrow Sunny / The Revelry, Spp
  6. Nicole Mitchell – Arc Of O
  7. Mary Halvorson Quintet – Bending Bridges
  8. Martin Küchen – Hellstorm
  9. Levity – Afternoon Delights
  10. Stian Westerhus – The Matriarch & The Wrong Kind Of Flower
Every contributor to the blog also made his own list of preferred albums.
Denti Alligator
1.             Eve Risser, Benjamin Duboc & Edward Perraud – En Corps
2.             Aaron Novik – Secret of Secrets
3.             Neneh Cherry & The Thing –  The Cherry Thing
4.             Bester Quartet –  Metamorphoses
5.             Charles Gayle – Streets
6.             Keith Rowe –  September
7.             Mats Gustafsson – Bengt
8.             David Krakauer –  Pruflas –  The Book of Angels Volume 18
9.             King Tears Bat Trip –  King Tears Bat Trip
10.          The Thing With Barry Guy –  Metal!
Paul Acquaro
1.             Mary Halvorson Quintet – Bending Bridges
2.             Elliot Sharp Trio – Aggregat
3.             9 Volt – Open Circuit
4.             Elephant9 with Reine Fiske – Atlantis
5.             Joe Morris, William Parker, Gerald Cleaver – Altitude
6.             Paul Dunmall & Tony Bianco – Thank You To John Coltrane
7.             Eivind Opsvik – Overseas IV
8.             Aych – As the Crow Flies
9.             Scorch Trio with Mars Williams – Made in Norway
10.          Tim Berne – Snake Oil
Tom Burris
1.             Eve Risser, Benjamin Duboc & Edward Perraud – En Corps
2.             Nicole Mitchell – Arc of O
3.             Jooklo Duo & Bill Nace – Scratch
4.             Mary Halvorson Quintet – Bending Bridges
5.             Henry Threadgill Zooid – Tomorrow Sunny / The Revelry, Spp
6.             Rob Mazurek Pulsar Quartet – Stellar Pulsations
7.             Sam Rivers, Dave Holland & Barry Altschul – Reunion: Live in New York
8.             Hairy Bones – Snakelust
9.             Noah Bernstein – Six
10.          Ballister – Mechanisms
Daniel Sorrelis
1.             Eve Risser, Benjamin Duboc & Edward Perraud – En Corps
2.             Eli Keszler – Catching Net
3.             Angles 8 – By Way of Deception: Live in Ljubjana
4.             Angharad Davies, Tisha Mukarji, Dimitria Lazaridou-Chatzigoga – Outwash
5.             Pedro Sousa & Hernâni Faustino – Falaise
6.             Martin Küchen – Hellstorm
7.             Way Out Northwest – The White Spot
8.             Mikołaj Trzaska, Ollie Brice, Mark Sanders – Riverloam Trio
9.             John Tilbury – For Tomasz Sikorski
10.          Henry Threadgill Zooid – Tomorrow Sunny/The Revelry, Spp.
Phil Coombs
1.             Angles 8 – By Way of Deception – Live in Ljubljana
2.             Nicole Mitchell – Arc of O
3.             Steve Lehman Trio – Dialect Fluorescent
4.             Daniel Erdmann – How to Catch a Cloud
5.             MMM Quartet – Live at Metz’ Arsenal
6.             Emile Parisien – Chien Guepe
7.             Aram Shelton Quartet – Everything for Somebody
8.             Matthew Shipp Trio – Elastic Aspects
9.             Max Johnson Quartet
10.          Eve Risser – En Corps
Joe Higham
1.             John Butcher and Toshimaru Nakamura – Dusted Machinery
2.             Levity – Afternoon Delights
3.             Aram Shelton Quartet – Everything for Somebody
4.             Daniel Erdmann – How to Catch a Cloud
5.             Marc Ducret – Tower Vol. 4
6.             Eve Risser – En Corps
7.             Outhouse – Straw, Sticks + Bricks.
8.             Arts and Sciences – New You
9.             Kay Grant & Alex Ward – Fast Talk
10.          Fred Lonberg-Holm’s Fast Citizens – Gather
Paolo Casertano
1.             Stian Westerhus – The Matriarch And The Wrong Kind Of Flowers
2.             Joe McPhee & Eli Keszler – Ithaca
3.             Nate Wooley/Peter Evans – Instrumental Vol. 1
4.             Colin Stetson & Mats Gustafsson – Stones
5.             The Thing with Barry Guy – Metal
6.             Steve Lehman Trio – Dialect Fluorescent
7.             Martin Küchen – Hellstorm
8.             Peter Kolovos – Black Colors
9.             Paradoxical Frog – Union
10.          John Tilbury – For Tomasz Sikorski
Ananth Krishnan
1.             Thomas Heberer – Cookbook
2.             Angles 8 – By Way of Deception: Live in Ljubjana
3.             Levity – Afternoon Delights
4.             Trespass Trio – Bruder Beda
5.             Maya Homburger and Barry Guy – Tales of Enchantment
Stef Gijssels
1.             Eve Risser, Benjamin Duboc & Edward Perraud – En Corps
2.             RED Trio + Nate Wooley – Stem
3.             Mikołaj Trzaska Ircha Clarinet Quartet* ‎– Zikaron – Lefanay
4.             Thomas Heberer’s Clarino – Cookbook (Red Toucan, 2012)
5.             Mathias Küchen – Hellstorm
6.             Wadada Leo Smith – Ten Freedom Summers
7.             Skogen – Ist Gefallen In Den Schnee
8.             Angles 8 – By Way of Deception: Live in Ljubjana
9.             Pretty Monsters
10.          Dark Poetry
Martin Schray
1.       Fire! – In the Mouth a Hand
2.       Peter Brötzmann’s Chicago Tentet+1 – Walk, Sleep, Love
3.       Evan Parker’s Electro Acoustic Ensemble –  Hasselt
4.       Stian Westerhus –  The Matriarch and the Wrong Kind of Flowers
5.       Hairy Bones – Snakelust
6.       Martin Küchen – Hellstorm
7.       Mats Gustafsson/Thurston Moore –  Play Some Fucking Stooges
8.       Colin Stetson/Mats Gustafsson – Stones
9.       Pao –  Pao
10.    Arts and Science  New You
…. and by the way, you can still vote for the HAPPY NEW EARS AWARD  for the most innovative listening experience of the year.

Jazz

(title unknown)


Untitled

Dexter Gordon Enters The Library of Congress

by Felix Contreras

“Jazz, to me, is a living music. It’s a music that since its beginning has expressed the feelings, the dreams, hopes of the people.”

Dexter Gordon once said that.

Dex. (The Dexter Gordon Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress)

We heard it when we attended a ceremony marking the acquisition of over 1,000 items from the saxophonist’s career at the Library of Congress made available by his widow, Maxine Gordon.

The collection includes items from throughout a career that spanned five decades. From his earliest days in Los Angeles until his death in 1990 — including memorabilia from his turn as a Oscar-nominated actor in Bertrand Tavernier’s 1987 film Round Midnight — it’s all there.

Maxine Gordon’s presentation about the making of Round Midnight revealed more quotables from Dexter. Seems the film’s success made him a big deal in Europe, and for the first time he had to travel with bodyguards. As he was being escorted in Italy, he turned to his wife and said, “This is the first time the police have been in front of me with their lights on!”

Dexter Gordon’s humor was just as legendary as his playing. That talent was well represented in the Library’s collection of Dexter’s records — including many original issue 78-rpm discs. Matt Barton, a curator for the Library of Congress’ Recorded Sound division, says the entire collection will be digitized at the LOC’s Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Va. We asked him to pull a couple of gems from the many boxes of vinyl albums, cassettes, CDs and 78-rpm records.

For Gordon’s early work, Barton choose a cut called “The Hunt,” which was a sequel of sorts to a more famous recording, 1947’s “The Chase”. Both records feature Gordon with fellow saxophonist Wardell Gray. But “The Hunt” was recorded live — it’s a 20-minute jam that was originally released on four 78-rpm discs! Here’s where the song picks up with Gordon and Gray:

Excerpt of “The Hunt,” from Dexter Gordon & Wardell Gray, The Hunt, Pt. 5-8 (Original Issue: Bop 101-102). Dexter Gordon, tenor saxophone; Wardell Gray, tenor saxophone; Howard McGhee, trumpet; Trummy Young, trombone; Sonny Criss, alto saxophone; Hampton Hawes, piano; Barney Kessel, guitar; Leroy Gray, bass; Ken Kennedy, drums. Los Angeles, Calif.: Recorded Jul. 6, 1947.

Gordon became a leading exponent of bebop, with numerous recordings throughout the 1940s and a little bit of the ’50s. Barton pointed out that there’s a paucity of recordings from the ’50s. Two short periods of incarceration for drug charges during that era that may have contributed to that. Maxine Gordon, who is completing the autobiography of her late husband, says he simply wouldn’t talk about those years, partly because he considered them a mistake he didn’t care to relive.

The LOC’s Barton picked up with a 1965 recording of the tune “I’m A Fool For Wanting You.” It comes from his prolific Blue Note Records era. Maxine Gordon said this was her favorite recording of her late husband:

“I’m A Fool To Want You,” from Dexter Gordon, Clubhouse (Blue Note). Dexter Gordon, tenor saxophone; Freddie Hubbard, trumpet; Barry Harris, piano; Bob Cranshaw, bass; Billy Higgins, drums. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Recorded May 27, 1965.

Purchase: Amazon.com / Amazon MP3 / iTunes

Dexter Gordon was jazz’s most famous ex-pat when he moved to Europe in 1964. He frequently gigged and recorded with many European musicians and other Americans, often from his home bases: first Paris, then Copenhagen. Our last archive sample is from 1967 and recorded in Copenhagen:

“Doxy,” from Dexter Gordon, The Montmartre Collection (Black Lion). Dexter Gordon, tenor saxophone; Kenny Drew, piano; Niels-Henning Orsted Pedersen, bass; Albert “Tootie” Heath, drums. Copenhagen, Denmark: Recorded Jul. 20, 1967.

In the film Round Midnight, Dexter Gordon plays a brilliant American saxophonist who comes to Paris for his last chance at success. (Warner Bros., Inc.)

So what happens to all this stuff?

Barton says LOC audio techs will meticulously digitize every recording. He pointed out that the LOC does not sonically clean up the recordings. The Library’s entire collection of sound recordings function as a window into history, and they attempt to present it as it sounded or as they received it.

Visitors to Washington, D.C. can walk into the LOC and listen to anything they have in their collection. However, there are legal limits as to what they can stream from their Web site, so not all of Dexter Gordon’s music will be available online.

It’s a big deal when this country’s guardians of our collective cultural history make a priority of preserving the work of jazz musicians. The recordings speak for themselves, but often letters and photographs tell stories that put the contributions of our heroes into thought-provoking social contexts.

As more of the post-World War II jazz innovators pass on, I hope their families consider donating their memorabilia to a cultural institution of their choice. There is more than just music in those boxes.

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The Late Jim Marshall’s Jazz Photographs

 NPR Blogs: A Blog Supreme3/26/10 1:22 PM

by Patrick Jarenwattananon

Miles Davis, amateur pugilist. (Jim Marshall)

Photographer Jim Marshall died earlier this week. NPR paused to consider his passing, here and also here.

He was best known as a rock photographer: The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin, Johnny Cash, Jimi Hendrix, The Grateful Dead, etc. But he also took wonderful, even iconic photos of John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk and Miles Davis — e.g. the one above. He got great shots, he says, because he earned the trust of great musicians, and they in turn gave him free rein, on and off stage.

At the MarshallPhoto.com Web site, Marshall relayed some fascinating stories about a few of the great shots. Concerning this boxing photo:

Here, Miles is in the ring at Newman’s Gym in San Francisco in 1971. Doesn’t exist anymore. It was like a sister to a famous gym in New York where pros went that was called Stillman’s. At Newman’s Gym, Miles used to work out. He used to box with guys, ‘Don’t hit me in the mouth, I gotta play tonight.’

A superior story, highlighting Miles’ outer defense mechanisms, follows after the jump:

I first photographed Miles Davis in 1959, but not too well. I remember after a show in Berkeley, California, a little later around 1960, I went up to him backstage and asked why he had a green trumpet. He shot back at me, ‘M———-r, do I ask you why you have a black camera?!’ Frightened the s— outta me for the next five years! After I moved to NY in 1962, I did a couple of covers for Miles, live records on Columbia. I went down the first time he played for Bill Graham at Winterland in San Francisco. I had made him a picture of my John Coltrane photo that I had taken in John’s garden. Backstage was crazy. He was surrounded by all the media, press, local TV stations and newspapers … it was a real big deal. I saw him and said, ‘Hey Miles’ he sort of grunted and acknowledged my presence. I gave him the print and said, ‘This is for you.’ ‘What is it? I’m busy.’ ‘It’s just something for you.’ ‘I’m busy,’ he says again. I walked away and he opens the package. People are all over him, asking questions, bothering him and trying to get to him, he tells them all to shut the f— up and leave him alone. He’s looking at the print. He loved Coltrane. ‘Hey Marshall, did you take this of John? You knew him like that? Why don’t you take pictures of me like this?’ And I said, ‘Why don’t you let me?’ After that I could do whatever I wanted with him. He had his moods but we were cool. It was trust. If John trusted me, then so did Miles and with trust I got great shots of him.”

In another photo blurb, Marshall says he went to Jimi Hendrix’s funeral with Miles. You can have a look at some of the other great shots, and the stories behind them, at the Web site. [Marshall Photo: The Collection]

Jorge Alberto Mussuto





sin titulo

Jorge Alberto Mussuto
jmussuto@gmail.com


catalog the E.C.M. Records only jazz & classic enjoy:)

Download now or preview on posterous

ECM_Cat_09.pdf (12927 KB)


Laia Genc & Liaison Tonique live in Cologne 2009

 bogard´s jazztapes2/27/10 1:15 PMbogardLaia Genc Sebastian Gramss Nils Tegen

Laia Genc – Piano
Sebastian Gramss – Bass
Nils Tegen – Drums

recorded live at “Loft” Cologne/ Germany, December 9, 2009

1. On the run
2. Thirsty Camel
3. Strange encounter
4. Poles apart
5. Stop and Snooze
6. Fooob
7. Ort
8. Indeed
9. If I was to (Laia Genc)
10. Legenden (Genc Tegen Gramss)
11. Fanfare 10 (Sebastian Gramss)
12. Remember when (Laia Genc)
13. Legenden II (Laia Genc)

“Somehow I always wanted to play the piano since I was a little kid. It stood there so friendly in the corner at my grandma´s place! It has always been my good friend over the years…experiencing music hasn´t always been easy for me, but I had some great mentors who helped me find my way! I am proud to have been meeting, talking, working and playing with some brave musicians, not only the ones I mentioned, but a lot more that were and of course still are important influences to me. Working now as a freelance I studied jazzpiano with Hubert Nuß and Prof. John Taylor at the conservatory in Cologne where I graduated in 2006. I have been a member of some german youthbigbands, the one to mention is the BuJazzO led by Peter Herbolzheimer. In the years 2001, 2002 and 2003 I was invited with the quartet Nurse Or Nuc, then the Terrence Ngassa Band and finally with my own trio to the Nachwuchswettbewerb Leipzig, a competition for young players. In 2004 I won the 1st place of the international competition Biberacher Jazzpreis with my trio the “LiaisonTonique”. With the Liaison Tonique I recorded my first cd “Trilogien” which appeared in 2005 on JazzHausMusik.”
The latest album of LiaisonTonique is called “Polyfangastronosia

Jorge Alberto Mussuto





Julia Hülsmann Trio live at Grüner Salon, Berlin 2009

 bogard´s jazztapes2/26/10 12:37 PMbogardHeinrich Köbberling Marc Muellbauer Julia Hülsmann

Photo © by: Volker Beushausen / ACT

Julia Hülsmann, piano
Marc Muellbauer, bass
Heinrich Köbberling, drums

recorded live at Grüner Salon, Berlin, December 2, 2009

1. The end of a summer (Julia Hülsmann)
2. Konbanwa (Heinrich Köbberling)
3. Kiss from a rose (Seal)
4. Last one out (Marc Muellbauer)
5. Kauf dir einen bunten Luftballon (Aldo von Pinelli/Anton Franz Josef Profes)
6. Zahlen, bitte (jetzt reicht’s) (Heinrich Köbberling)
7. Jackson (Marc Muellbauer)
8. Whole lotta love (Jimmy Page/ Robert Plant/ John Paul Jones/ John Bonham/ Willie Dixon)

The End Of A Summer – first ECM release for a trio with a strong following. Julia Hülsmannfounded her group in 1997 and it has become, with its strongly melodic and inventive music, one of the most popular groups on the German jazz scene. Hülsmann is a first-rate jazz composer as well as an incisive pianist, a poetic sense of compression distinguishing both her writing and her improvising. Album features six new tunes by Hülsmann plus pieces also by her trio partners – plus a cover of Seal’s “Kiss From A Rose”.

Jorge Alberto Mussuto





Gerry Mulligan & Chet Baker – Carnegie Hall Concert ~ Mastersound Gold ZK 64769

AvaxHome RSS:/music/audiophile2/18/10 7:57 AMGutheadMusic, Lossless (wav, ape, flac …), +Jazz, 90s, 70s, +Audiophile , English, MasterSound

Gerry Mulligan & Chet Baker – Carnegie Hall Concert
1995 Sony SBM Mastersound Gold ZK 64769 
Eac Flac | Eac Log + Cue | Scans | ~500 Mb | RS + 5%
Original 1974 | 77:46 min | Jazz

This 1974 release finds Gerry Mulligan and Chet Baker together in a live setting. The two jazz paragons hadn’t worked together in 10 years, but from the first downbeat it’s evident that they still possess the musical rapport they’d developed as young men. Taking the West Coast by storm 22 years earlier with their famed pianoless quartet, Mulligan and Baker had the keen ability to work almost as one performer. This is clearly evident on “Bernie’s Tune,” where they trade licks on the tune’s bridge in articulate, fluid gestures, almost as one player. This album is testament to their ability to adapt and embrace modern jazz stylings. When they hark back to their roots on compositions such as “My Funny Valentine” and “Line For Lyons,” they play with a kind of casual, relaxed swing indicative of the ’50s cool jazz feel they helped create.TEF

Jorge Alberto Mussuto





Uncompromising guitars

 Free Jazz2/11/10 5:54 PMfreejazzblog@live.be (stef)Guitar Trio
You like uncompromising guitars? Hard-hitting drums and relentless bass? Here are some treats. Pump up the volume. Evacuate the neighborhood. Only the fearless can stay. 

Stephan Sieben, Adam Pultz Melbye, Håkon Berre – Angel (Ilk Music, 2009)

I don’t know how you call this. Trash jazz? Noise jazz? Punk jazz? Metal jazz? In any case violence and destruction are surely the code words for this Danish trio, with Stephan Sieben on electric guitar, Adam Pultz Melbye on bass and Håkon Berre on drums. They do not compromise. It is all energy and noise. The guitar is maximally distorted. It is all about power and rawness. It is all about destruction and rage. Even the pieces like “Me”, that start quietly, do not stay like that for long. Energy kicks in and off we go, full of dissonant chords and chord changes over endless pumping rhythms. But in truth, they try in some tracks to be creative with sound, as on “Chicks”, and even become calm near the end with “Ate”. What kind of jazz? Fire jazz! Guaranteed to scorch your ears and ignite your scalp.

Olaf Rupp, Marino Pliakas & Michael Wertmüller – Toomuchisnotenough (FMP, 2009)

Regular readers of this blog will already have come across bassist Marino Pliakas and drummer Michael Wertmüller. Not so long ago they released “Black Hole” with Peter Brötzmann, music which has its sensitive moments, but is widely characterized by its power play, as you may expect from a band with the name “Full Blast”. Now, the rhythm section accompanies the wild guitar of Olaf Rupp, who goes even a stretch further than Stephan Sieber.When you think you’ve heard it all, there is always a step which goes beyond expectations. This album comes without warnings for your health, and maybe it should. It is even hard to discern differences between chords because of the heavy distortion of the guitar and bass guitar. But in its mercilessness for the ears, it is a as iconoclastic as it gets, and that by itself deserves credits. Forget about what you know. Forget about genres too. And in the midst of this sonic hell, there are some surprising moments of creativity, yet you have to dig through the avalanche of noise to get to it. The best sonic clarity you get is from the drums, and I must say Wertmüller is a fantastic drummer. And I can appreciate Rupp’s and Pliakas’ unrelenting and uncompromising energy and attitude, but I do not think I will listen to this album very often.

© stef

Jorge Alberto Mussuto





Cassandra Wilson – Live in Verona ’94

 inconstant sol2/17/10 12:44 PMriccardoCassandra Wilson

Basically the live version of the album “Blue Light ‘Til Dawn”,
one of the true peaks in all Cassandra’s career.

Rec. live at “Teatro Romano”, Verona, Italy,
on June 25, 1994 (mics recording)

Cassandra Wilson,vocal
Brandon Ross,guitar,musical conductor
Charlie Burnham,violin,harmonica,mandolin
Lonnie Plaxico,bass
Jeffrey Haynes,percussion
Lance Carter,drums

01. Come On In My Kitchen [R.Johnson] (6:17)
02. Children Of The Night [T.Bell/L.Creed] (9:09)
03. Skylark [H.Carmichael] (9:46)
04. Redbone [C.Wilson] (12:27)
05. I Can’t Stand The Rain [A.Peebles/D.Bryant/B.Miller] (7:11)
06. Band Intro (0:42) 
07. Blue Light ‘Til Dawn [C.Wilson] (6:20)
08. Black Crow [J.Mitchell] (8:35)
09. Tupelo Honey [V.Morrison] (8:00)
10. Hellhound On My Trail [R.Johnson] (5:21)

Total Time 1:13:51

Jorge Alberto Mussuto





Depart live at Northern German Broadcast/ Hamburg 2009

 bogard´s jazztapes2/17/10 1:13 PMbogardHarry Sokal Heiri Känzig Jojo Mayer

Photo © by: Francesca Pfeffer

Harry Sokal (sax)
Heiri Känzig (b)
Jojo Mayer (dr)

recorded live at Rolf-Liebermann-Studio, Hamburg, December 17 & 18, 2009

1. Mountain Messenger (Heiri Känzig)
2. Slice Of Bread (Heiri Känzig)
3. Magic Transition (Harry Sokal)
4. Less We Can (Harry Sokal/ Jojo Mayer)
5. Drei im Quadrat (Harry Sokal/ Heiri Känzig)
6. Du liebä Bueb vom Ämmital (Trad./ Arr. Heiri Känzig)

When Reloaded (ACT 9453-2) came out in 2006, it was hailed as “comeback album of the year”. In reality, the trio has more or less gone in a new direction. Part of the reason has been Jojo Mayer, the onetime substitute for Studer who has permanently taken over from his landsman. There had been a recent flowering of the piano trio that either revisits the romanticism of a Bill Evans or runs in the direction of pop. This triumvirate cleared away all the dead brush with their cascading powerhouse style. Almost one and a half year after Reloaded, Depart encapsulates this style with Mountain Messenger. The powerful group dynamic is even more impressive, as indicated by the fact that many of the pieces are cooperatively composed and arranged. Three instruments, three musical destinies, three extremely different sets of experiences meld into a single indissoluble impression. There are no interminable solos over the usual patterns here – the three are continually interacting, feeding each other new lines.

Jorge Alberto Mussuto





Lee Morgan – Lee-Way (1960) {2008 Analogue Productions Remaster} AvaxHome RSS:/music/audiophile

2/17/10 6:54 AMruskavalMusic, Lossless (wav, ape, flac …), +Jazz, 60s, Classic Jazz, +Audiophile , Lossy HQ (320 Kbps CBR), YEAR 2008

Lee Morgan – Lee-Way (1960) {2008 Analogue Productions Remaster}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC+CUE+LOG -> 234 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 90 Mb
Full Artwork @ 300 dpi (jpg) -> 19 Mb
© 2008 EMI / Blue Note / Analogue Productions | CBNJ 84034 SA
Jazz / Hard Bop / Post Bop / Trumpet

In the 1960’s hard-bop sweepstakes, one of Freddie Hubbard’s true rivals was Lee Morgan. The late Morgan was known for his brassy, searing style, but he could be tender and lyrical as well. Recorded in 1960 (significantly before Morgan’s success with THE SIDEWINDER), LEE-WAY is in many ways one of the most quintessential hard bop discs ever recorded. The band is incredible, practically an edition of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers: Blakey on drums, Bobby Timmons’s earthy piano, Jackie McLean’s acidic, fluid alto saxophone, and Miles Davis’s bassist Paul Chambers. This is primo, driving hard bop, with slight overtones of the era’s soul-jazz sound.

Jorge Alberto Mussuto